The Missing Element

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Yesterday, I shared four blogs on which I’d placed substantive comments. Today’s Blogging 101 assignment is true. Of the four, one of them stayed with me enough to influence the direction for the STUDIO. But another of the four used the same technique — photography. Deanna’s photos of Clouds and Sunsets underscore the narrative in her posts. They illustrate her appreciation for God’s creation. She has a vast repository of photography from over the years that she continues to expand.

Another self-photographer, Chameleon, uses her own photographs as well. Her posts are written in both English and French — yet use the same photos. This speaks volumes on the power of a photograph and reminds me of the quote:

“A picture is worth a thousand words.”

I’d like to amend that quote and add, “A picture needs no translation.”

The content of these two blogs focuses on completely different subject matters. But they both come across as more personal. And I think it’s the photography that makes the difference.

WP_FI_Photography copyWhile scouting for stock photography is an enjoyable pastime, personal photos seem to add a layer of authenticity to a blog. My only camera is the one in my Galaxy S3, which I understand can deliver quality images. It’s a welcome alternative to my broke-down low-mp Canon that’s held together by a rubber-band after being dropped. I’ve read about how the GS3 takes great pictures and that the various levels can be adjusted to affect different image styles. I think I want to add this layer of authenticity to a Commonplace STUDIO. What this means is that I’ll have to spend less time at the keyboard and get to snappin’.

I can usually tell a stock photo from a personal one. And, along with the stock photography comes the responsibility of attribution.

I’m more into the writing aspect of blogging; so the switch to personal photography will be a slow, methodical one. I know not to expect professional quality; but I do aim for my photos to be above “point and shoot.” So, I’ll continue to use stock photography, and work a suitable attribution style into my posts. And, of course, I’ll announce when one of my own images is featured. Wow. Who knew? “Blogging 101 is just what this STUDIO needed” said Miss Donna as she added yet another stock photo to the STUDIO. 🙂

✍ Be it Resolved

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “To Be Resolved.”

Rather than New Years resolutions — what about daily improvements? Do they count? And do they have to be called resolutions ? KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAAnd do they have to be proclaimed publicly ? I try to make corrections as soon as I realize there’s a problem. I don’t think anyone does this; but the whole idea of New Years resolutions suggests that that’s the only time improvements can be made.

Character is the ability to carry out a good resolution long after the excitement of the moment has passed.
Cavett Robert

I think I stopped making resolutions a few years after I realized my sister’s observation about me was right. She teased me about my habit of making resolution amendments. “You always say you’re gonna do something by Christmas .” Of course we laughed about it. But as soon as she said it, I knew she was right. It took me a while — as I caught myself stopping short of using Christmas as my deadline. If she were here, we would still be laughing about it. In fact, I’m smiling as I remember that the year-end holiday of Christmas was my mark for everything that needed to be done.

So, not only did I make resolutions. I amended the ones I had managed to actually keep with other improvements I thought needed to be made that year. I guess I tried the failed resolutions again the following year. Crazy . . . The mere mention of New Years resolutions can elicit a smirk and head-shake reaction from me. It’s actually pretty amusing to read other people’s resolutions as I think, “Did they actually wait until New Years to figure out they needed to make that change?”

Being my own worst critic, I’m happy to make self-improvements as the realizations arise. No, I do not make New Years resolutions. But I do look forward to reading other peoples’. It’s amusing to see that we all need to make similar adjustments.

I do, however, wish you a Happy, Prosperous, and Safe New Year.

To Be Resolved